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Ideas for a new tool.

Alan F

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I hope you won't need a welder for this project!!
No, it’s been amazing how well this idea is coming together. I found this enclosure yesterday. It comes in a variety of sizes.
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Alan F

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I have the sister car to that one - same colors. Mine is a barn find, no rust, original paint. It’s a Monza, top level trim, with factory AC and auto. The interior is mint, if not dirty. The body is straight as a string. Vandals broke 3 windows but thankfully that’s all. Last on the road in 1979.

It’s sitting in the barn of a central Texas former chicken farm. I’m told they had 5000 laying hens. It’s the first one I want to get running. Just got to go back and get it.
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Alan F

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First of the new parts came today.
I got the control panel, fuel pump and fuel cutoff valves. The fuel tank is a little longer lead time.
I have done some research on a tach/dwell/voltmeter combo. I'm thinking about two different ones. The one I think I want is a little more expensive but will work out really nicely. I'll show you when I decide.
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Alan F

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I finally got my small fuel run tank last week so I'm ready to keep moving forward. Upon inspection, the bulkhead connector that came with the fuel tank was supposed to be 5/16". In fact it's a 3/16". So, I need a bigger bulkhead connector.

I put together a wiring diagram for the panel. I decided to add three mini-indicator lights to the panel. I'm going to use one to let me know that the fuel pump is on, one to hook up to cars that have oil pressure lights and another that could be hooked to any other sensor like a temperature light.

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Yesterday, I ordered some parts to finish the function of the unit. I ordered 5 spools of multi-colored wire, a bulkhead connector that is 1/2" (that way I can neck it down to any size), an assortment of weatherpack connectors, and a pack of colored alligator clips. I'll get it wired up this week.

I have a purchased a vintage Craftsman tach/dwell/volt/ohm meter that I'm going to use. Additionally, I have some vintage SW oil and temp gauges. The only other thing I need is a vacuum gauge. After I get all the parts together, I will decided on the final size and shape of a housing to hold it all. Stay tuned.
 

Alan F

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Over the weekend, I was working on getting the white '65 Corvair Coupe running. It did not have a distributor (unless it's in the trunk that we have not yet been in). So, I removed the distributor from the '67 Monza and started prepping it for install. I immediately noticed it was stiff to turn and missing the coil lead. I started taking it apart and ended up rebuilding it. I was shocked at how dry everything was. The shaft had a lot of heated oil baked on to the shaft. I just kept spritzing it with carb cleaner and it finally came out after totally dismantling it. I lubed it all up including cleaning the centrifugal advance weights. The vacuum advance was functional so just cleaned it up. I showed the yungun how to set the points and started setting up a mock ignition system on the workbench. I want to make sure everything works before it is installed.

The car was missing the muffler and I cannot start it without exhaust in my neighborhood (HOA board member next door). The yungun had found a used dual exhaust system with manifolds on FB Marketplace for $75 which we had already picked up. So he removed the manifolds and made those ready to install.

I started digging out all of my materials to finish the fabrication of the remote switch because I will be using it soon. I may do a YouTube video of it mocked up on the workbench.
 

Nashville Cat

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Just a thought, but have you ever considered selling off some of those corvairs and buying a 95% complete one that's solid and rust-free ?
Like this southern CA car :
 

Alan F

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There are multiple objectives contained within the selection of cars that we currently have and are focused upon. A restored or really nice car doesn't fit my agenda right now. But there is a plan. My son recently came across a restorable Yenko Stinger that he wants to pursue. I'm interested but really can't elevate that purchase to priority. I may regret it later but que sera. I also want to end up with a nice '68 Corsa Coupe with the 140HP engine.

Additionally, two of the Corvairs we have are vans. I really want to restore the Greenbrier, convert it to an 8 door and manual trans. It's rust free, original and has been parked on blocks since 1967. There's a good amount of innate value in it.
 

kmakar

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Buying a car in nice shape is great, but for me it's the journey of fixing something is where I derive my enjoyment. I'd rather have a basket case than one already close to finished.
 

Nashville Cat

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Buying a car in nice shape is great, but for me it's the journey of fixing something is where I derive my enjoyment. I'd rather have a basket case than one already close to finished.
You guys are good at body work and that's my weakest ability. Plus being 67, I still can work pretty hard but sanding really takes it outta me. LOL
I do all the mechanical stuff but need a project car that has good bones to start with. :)
 
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