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Building Our Barndominium

77cruiser

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Our clay packs & make an excellent dirt track though. Not too easy to dig though.
 

L78fanatic

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I dug a whole mess of test holes to find an area without limerock. Every spot I dug limerock was 2' down and can't put a leaching field there, but finally got a spot in front (in the first pic you can see to mounds of dirt/sand and those were good, so that's where the leaching field will go.

The plumbing under the slab will be dug by hand as it offers a cleaner and smaller trench.
Sometime you can punch through the hardpan to better soil and go with a standard drainfield. We did that with our home and never had one issue for over 12 years. On a side note, our oldest son & wife just returned from Ohio where they are building their dream home on a lovely 5+ acre piece of farmland, about 25% treed. They had some massive equipment in there late last week and this weekend digging the foundations and pouring footers. The driveway is several hundred feet long from the road. His shop will be a 40ft x 50ft building (stick, not a pole building). black metal siding and roof.....gonna be real sweet!

Obviously they are super excited, and they should be.

Some good things can happen during shitty times! Nice to see some positives. You don't even want to know how my IRA is tanking (there goes the Chevelle!) :cry:
 

kmakar

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Sometime you can punch through the hardpan to better soil and go with a standard drainfield. We did that with our home and never had one issue for over 12 years. On a side note, our oldest son & wife just returned from Ohio where they are building their dream home on a lovely 5+ acre piece of farmland, about 25% treed. They had some massive equipment in there late last week and this weekend digging the foundations and pouring footers. The driveway is several hundred feet long from the road. His shop will be a 40ft x 50ft building (stick, not a pole building). black metal siding and roof.....gonna be real sweet!

Obviously they are super excited, and they should be.

Some good things can happen during shitty times! Nice to see some positives. You don't even want to know how my IRA is tanking (there goes the Chevelle!) :cry:

Problem is when you hit limestone it can go for hundreds of feet deep so there is no drainage.

I'm happy for your son and his wife... Building your home from scratch that you designed is most people's dream come true. Good for them.

Keep your chin up John, the market will crash, but will it rebound again.
 

L78fanatic

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Problem is when you hit limestone it can go for hundreds of feet deep so there is no drainage.

I'm happy for your son and his wife... Building your home from scratch that you designed is most people's dream come true. Good for them.

Keep your chin up John, the market will crash, but will it rebound again.

Kevin,

You are right. Sarasota near the Gulf is not a large limestone area at all...the water table is more of a problem there. But, "hardpan" is quite common in those areas as it's like a clay layer that can impede the flow of water downward in the soil. So, it was common to punch through it for on lot septic system drainfields. I remember only designing a couple standard septic systems and limestone was never an issue in those areas. I believe limestone is much more prevalent "inland" in Florida. But, I know it can be pretty much anywhere actually.

How many snakes did you come across clearing your lot? Ha! I'd be surprised if you say "none"! One thing I don't miss about Florida is the snakes and the lizards! :) As a kid in grade school we used to play with scorpions when shooting marbels in the sand during recess! Good memories!
 

kmakar

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Kevin,

You are right. Sarasota near the Gulf is not a large limestone area at all...the water table is more of a problem there. But, "hardpan" is quite common in those areas as it's like a clay layer that can impede the flow of water downward in the soil. So, it was common to punch through it for on lot septic system drainfields. I remember only designing a couple standard septic systems and limestone was never an issue in those areas. I believe limestone is much more prevalent "inland" in Florida. But, I know it can be pretty much anywhere actually.

How many snakes did you come across clearing your lot? Ha! I'd be surprised if you say "none"! One thing I don't miss about Florida is the snakes and the lizards! :) As a kid in grade school we used to play with scorpions when shooting marbels in the sand during recess! Good memories!

No snakes I saw when they were clearing. Our last place we just sold we had lots of black racers (good snake that kills the pigmy rattler), some coachwhips (endangered), and a couple of coral snakes we killed. Tons and tons of geckos.
 
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